NatyTutyFruty
To weird to live, to rare to die. ***
NatyTutyFruty
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trameda:

Just woke up from a nap. I relate to this on a spiritual level.
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danielabelenuniverse:

como se llama el libro?
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laissezfairenuxxdetre:

trendingly:

The Best Way To Pass Time On The Train
Click Here To See More Like This!

I’m gonna start doing this 
laissezfairenuxxdetre:

trendingly:

The Best Way To Pass Time On The Train
Click Here To See More Like This!

I’m gonna start doing this 
laissezfairenuxxdetre:

trendingly:

The Best Way To Pass Time On The Train
Click Here To See More Like This!

I’m gonna start doing this 
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turntides:

The beginning of the end for SeaWorld’s shows!?
While SeaWorld may be celebrating its 50th anniversary, it may not have many more birthday shows to come.
After the Blackfish documentary was released in January last year it has created a phenomenal wave of disgust in SeaWorld’s direction.
SeaWorld suffered a whopping $15.9 million loss, and also had to disable commenting on many of their Facebook pages and their YouTube account due to the amount of protest they received from the public. But that won’t silence the world - the blows at SeaWorld are still continuing, and are rising to a whole new level.
Senator Greg Ball proposed legislation in New York that ban keeping orca in captivity - and it has passed in the state’s Standing Committee on Environmental Conservation this week. Senate Bill 6613 would ban “the possession and harbouring of killer whales in New York State aquariums and sea parks” (Sen. Greg Bill).
Also, earlier this month (7th March 2014) assemblyman Richard Bloom introduced the Orca Welfare and Safety Act in the state of California. Bill AB 2140 would ban the captivity of killer whales for entertainment purposes, captive orca breeding, and it would also put an end to the importation and deportation of orca into, and out of the state. The “Blackfish Bill”, as it’s also known, has already gained over 1 million signatures and is looking very promising due to its tremendous support.
Is this the beginning of the end for SeaWorld’s orca and dolphin performances? Let us hope so!
If you would like to learn more about Blackfish V SeaWorld don’t hesitate to contact us here at Turn Tides.
Also, don’t forget to sign the Blackfish Bill (AB 2140) Petition! Every signature counts.
*****
Update (28th March 2014): We have changed some of the information above to stress the closure of the orca shows and not SeaWorld as a whole. We are aware that SeaWorld makes a few rescue and conservation contributions also, but the focus of this article is on the freedom of the orcas and, hopefully in the future, the dolphins.
*****
turntides:

The beginning of the end for SeaWorld’s shows!?
While SeaWorld may be celebrating its 50th anniversary, it may not have many more birthday shows to come.
After the Blackfish documentary was released in January last year it has created a phenomenal wave of disgust in SeaWorld’s direction.
SeaWorld suffered a whopping $15.9 million loss, and also had to disable commenting on many of their Facebook pages and their YouTube account due to the amount of protest they received from the public. But that won’t silence the world - the blows at SeaWorld are still continuing, and are rising to a whole new level.
Senator Greg Ball proposed legislation in New York that ban keeping orca in captivity - and it has passed in the state’s Standing Committee on Environmental Conservation this week. Senate Bill 6613 would ban “the possession and harbouring of killer whales in New York State aquariums and sea parks” (Sen. Greg Bill).
Also, earlier this month (7th March 2014) assemblyman Richard Bloom introduced the Orca Welfare and Safety Act in the state of California. Bill AB 2140 would ban the captivity of killer whales for entertainment purposes, captive orca breeding, and it would also put an end to the importation and deportation of orca into, and out of the state. The “Blackfish Bill”, as it’s also known, has already gained over 1 million signatures and is looking very promising due to its tremendous support.
Is this the beginning of the end for SeaWorld’s orca and dolphin performances? Let us hope so!
If you would like to learn more about Blackfish V SeaWorld don’t hesitate to contact us here at Turn Tides.
Also, don’t forget to sign the Blackfish Bill (AB 2140) Petition! Every signature counts.
*****
Update (28th March 2014): We have changed some of the information above to stress the closure of the orca shows and not SeaWorld as a whole. We are aware that SeaWorld makes a few rescue and conservation contributions also, but the focus of this article is on the freedom of the orcas and, hopefully in the future, the dolphins.
*****
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annieandfinnickodair:


breakmefromtheinside:

alyssaemilie:

romeo and juliet (1996)

Juliet is a metaphor for an Oscar. 

Only for that comment
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byrongraffiti:

Scott is the realest nigga alive.
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motherslockupyoursons:

unicornmunch:

flurle:

lunarynth:

never NOT reblogging this. When people say this, they’re implying that a mans natural state is ‘rapist’ - that when they see a woman, they must CONTROL themselves so they don’t rape them - as if they have no control over themselves because they’re some sort of sexual beast. 

YOU GO GIRL!

this is beautiful. c’:

preach it girl i feel you
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earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
earthandanimals:

panthxra:

steinkyle:

Tiger Kingdom, Chiang Mai. Any place that offers the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful animals should be filled with skepticism. Here are my thoughts.
Good: Hugs, not drugs. The animals are well fed and cared for by fantastic staff that grooms them for human interaction from a very young age. From all angles it seems like the the tigers are genuinely looked after and, of course, photo opportunities are abundant.
Not-so-good: Tourism over education. Tigers here are born and bred on site and will never, of course, be released into their natural habitat, nor will they ever roam very much at all in the small areas they live. They may be well taken care of, but the reality is that these are big, beautiful, domesticated cats - not wild animals. While that’s for the most part expected, they could do a lot more to educate the thousands of daily visitors on the current plight of this incredible animal. Unfortunately a lot of people may come and go without ever knowing that the 3,000 or so left in the wild are disappearing quickly - hopefully that will change as their facilities grow.
So is it ethical? It’s great that they’re helping to keep the cats around, but seeing them lounging around for photos all day like they do here will leave a sour, selfish taste in your mouth, especially considering the nonexistent educational component. The Kingdom does, however, do it’s part to responsibly care for the animals; so if you’re okay with the idea that these cats are here to stay or be sold to a zoo, it’s an exciting experience. I have mixed feelings, but I will say that those little ones are pretty damn cute!

it’s sort of refreshing to see posts that don’t just include things “i took a picture with a tiger omg so cute!!!!” i’m glad you reflected on the not-so-good aspects of tiger kingdom, but, unfortunately, the not-so-good outweigh the good. no respectable facility allows unprotected contact between its dangerous animals and the general public; it’s irresponsible, dangerous for humans, and it gives extremely poor messages to the public such as tigers (and other big cats) are “just big kitties!” when they most certainly are not. i encourage you to read this post on the subject, and to not support facilities like tiger kingdom in the future.

Wild animals locked up so that we humans can “meet and greet” them.. how lovely. 
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black-and-white-gifs:

Daisy